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Cardiology Hospitals India
Tuesday, 31 March 2009
Cardiology Hospitals India - Chest Pain
Topic: Chest Pain

Chest pain includes feelings of heaviness, pressure, squeezing, or discomfort in the chest. Although chest pain has many possible causes, any chest discomfort that is new or different should be checked out. At worst, you have caught a serious problem, such as a heart problem, early enough to get needed emergency treatment; at best, it is nothing of concern and you have only lost a little time while gaining a great deal of peace of mind. Chest pain may also be an early sign of a disease that is slowly developing and treatment can begin before it becomes worse. Some possible causes of chest pain include heartburn, heart attack, gastric ulcer, anxiety, asthma, gallbladder, muscle strain, angina, pneumonia, blood clot (embolism) and rib cartilage inflammation.

WHAT YOUR DOCTOR CAN DO:

• Diagnosis will begin with a medical history and physical exam.
• Tests are likely to include laboratory blood tests, a scan or X-ray of the lungs, cardiac catheterization, and electrocardiogram (ECG, a painless, noninvasive procedure that records electrical activity of the heart).
• Because there are so many possible causes, other diagnostic test and treatments will vary widely. It may take some time to identify the exact cause.

WHAT YOU CAN DO:

It is important to identify any factors associated with the chest pain:
• Exact location, type of pain, anything that seems to make it worse or better, and other symptoms you have at the same time.
• Chest pain may be sharp or dull, mild or severe. It may come on suddenly or gradually, there may be a feeling of pressure and squeezing; or a stabbing sensation.
• Other symptoms might include shortness of breath, difficulty breathing, dizziness, nausea, sweating, cough, or fever.
• Note if it is worse with activity or movement and the time of day. Is it worse when you take a deep breath? Does the pain radiate, spreading down an arm, to the jaw, or the shoulder? How long does it last?
• The more accurately and specifically you can describe the pain, the faster and more accurately diagnosis can be made and treatment can be started.

WHAT YOU CAN EXPECT:

• This will depend on the cause of the chest pain and necessary treatment.
• Your doctor may allow you to continue regular activities, but be aware that there may be further incidents of pain, new symptoms, or a change in the severity or type of chest pain.


Posted by carehospitals at 4:17 PM
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Cardiology Hospitals India - Cardiac Scans
Topic: Cardiac Scans

Cardiac scans are special tests doctors order to determine how heart muscle functions, and if there is any muscle damage. There are three major types of scans that are commonly used: technetium pyrophosphate (also called infarct or hot spot myocardial imaging), thallium (also called cold spot myocardial imaging, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, or MIBI stress test), and cardiac blood pool scanning (also called a MUGA scan). A newer technique not yet in widespread use is the PET scan (positron emission tomography). 

Procedure:


• All of these scans involve the injection of a radioactive substance (isotope) into the bloodstream that allows imaging of the heart muscle.
• These procedures can all be done on an outpatient basis, like regular X-rays.
• You will be able to drive yourself home after the procedure.

RISKS:

• There is a small risk of infection caused by introducing the injection through the skin.
• Because the isotope has a very small amount of radiation and lasts only a short time in the body, risk of radiation exposure is very small


Posted by carehospitals at 4:15 PM
Updated: Tuesday, 31 March 2009 4:16 PM
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Cardiology Hospitals India -Cerebral angiography
Topic: Cerebral Angiography

Cerebral angiography involves injecting a contrast agent (x-ray dye) into an artery in the neck in order to see the blood vessels in the neck and brain. This is useful for detecting stroke or locating tumors, blood clots, aneurysms (weak area in a blood vessel), or other abnormalities.

Procedure:

• Normally angiograms are done in the hospital.
• You will be instructed not to eat or drink for 6-8 hours before the test.
• You will be given a mild sedative to help you relax and an IV will be started in order to give other medication if needed.
• After an injection of local anesthetic (a numbing medication), a thin catheter (small, flexible plastic tube) is inserted through a small incision in the arm.
• The doctor 'threads' the catheter up the vein or artery into a vessel in the neck.
• Once in position, dye is injected so that the physician may take x-rays to see the blood vessels.
• The dye may cause a feeling like a hot flash' or some burning or brief nausea.

Risk:

• There is a small risk of developing a stroke during the procedure caused by a clot or piece of plaque (blockage) that may be broken off by the catheter. This is a very uncommon complication.
• Other small risks exist for puncturing a blood vessel with the catheter, and developing infection, pain, or swelling at the site of catheter insertion.
• In elderly persons or in those with kidney disease, the contrast material may lead to temporary or permanent kidney failure (rare).
• It is recommended that you drink plenty of fluids after the angiogram to flush the kidneys.
• Allergic reactions to the contrast material can occur, but are usually easily managed


Posted by carehospitals at 4:13 PM
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Cardiac Catheterisation
Topic: Cardiac Catheterization

Cardiac Catheterization

Cardiac catheterization (also called a coronary angiogram) is a test using x-ray dye (contrast material) and x-rays to see the heart and coronary arteries. Since it can show if the arteries are narrowed or blocked, it is often used to determine if bypass surgery is necessary. It usually takes 30-60 minutes to perform the test. If a blockage is detected and needs to be treated right away, an angioplasty (balloon dilation) may be required.

Procedure:


• Normally, angiograms are done in the hospital.
• You will be instructed not to eat or drink for 6-8 hours before the test.
• You will be given a mild sedative to help you relax and an IV will be started in order to give you other medication if needed.
• After an injection of local anesthetic (a numbing medication), a thin catheter (small, flexible plastic tube) is inserted through a small incision in the arm or groin.
• Once in position, dye is injected so that the physician may take an x-ray to see the actual beating of the heart and functioning of the heart valves.
• The dye may cause a feeling like a 'hot flash' or some burning or nausea briefly.
• A bandage is applied to the groin to prevent bleeding.
• You will rest and be observed for several hours after the procedure.

RISKS:

• There is a small risk of developing a stroke during the procedure caused by a blood clot or piece of plaque (blockage) that may be broken off by the catheter. This is a very uncommon complication.
• Other small risks exist for puncturing a blood vessel with the catheter, and developing infection, pain, or swelling at the site of catheter insertion.
• In elderly persons or in those with kidney disease, the contrast material may lead to temporary or permanent kidney failure (rare).
• Allergic reactions to the contrast material can occur, but are usually easily managed.
Following the procedure:

Following the procedure:

• It is common to experience fatigue or soreness from lying in awkward positions during the procedure.
• It is recommended that you drink plenty of fluids after the angiogram to flush the kidneys


Posted by carehospitals at 12:23 PM
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